Search

Is there a problem with early voting and mail in voting?

Various election topics have been trending on Google over the past few weeks, but the most recent topic has been “Can I change my vote” (https://www.foxnews.com/politics/can-i-change-my-vote-trends-google-what-you-need-to-know). This election cycle has been unique, especially considering the precautions people are taking because of the COVID pandemic. Many have turned to absentee ballots, mail in ballots, and early voting to limit their exposure to large crowds on election day. At this point over 59 million people have voted already with one week to go. During this time, however, much has transpired between the final presidential debate and President Trump’s recent confirmation Justice Amy Coney Barrett. Some are now reconsidering their votes, especially in swing states.


Here are some instances where changing a vote is allowed:


New York: Voters who have submitted an absentee ballot but change their minds can show up to their polling place during early voting or on Election Day and cast a vote, in which case the absentee ballot is set aside and not counted


Michigan: Voters who have sent in a ballot can submit a written and signed request to their voting clerk by 5 p.m. Oct. 30 requesting to have the ballot nullified


New Hampshire: Voters who submitted an absentee ballot can go to the polls on Election Day during the first hour they're open and vote in person, or before their absentee ballot is processed.


Wisconsin: If time allows, a voter can cancel their original absentee ballot and request a new one – but they have until Oct. 29, the legal deadline for requesting absentee ballots by mail.


While the phrase is trending we will have to see if it will have an impact on the final election results on November 3rd.


Image Credit: iStock

2 views0 comments